Clutch - Psychic Warfare World Tour 2017

Clutch - Psychic Warfare World Tour 2017

Devin Townsend Project, The Obsessed

Saturday, December 16

Doors: 6:30 pm / Show: 8:00 pm

26

This event is all ages

Absolutely no refunds - no exceptions.

Lineups and times are subject to change.

No re-entry.

 

Clutch
Clutch
On their ninth studio album, Strange Cousins from the West, the Maryland hard rockers continue to grow musically. Due out July 7th 2009, Strange Cousins sees the innovative quartet stirring up a sonic crock-pot of chugging blues riffs, punk rock grit, bombastic funk beats and raw, infectious vocals. Guitarist Tim Sult rips through epic grooves on cuts like "Motherless Child," while bassist Dan Maines and drummer Jean-Paul Gaster lay an impenetrable rhythmic foundation on the likes of "Minotaur." Meanwhile, Neil Fallon croons out a soulful cacophony, lyrically conjuring an intergalactic pulp fiction. Invite these Cousins in, and you'll never be the same.
Neil sees this record as a logical progression for the band. Describing Strange Cousins' sound, he explains, "This album is more stripped-down and riff-oriented. The songs really cut to the chase—getting to the jump and getting out. There was an economy of writing, and the instrumentation stands out."

The first single, "50,000 Unstoppable Watts" illuminates that. The track packs a potent punch, quickly bouncing and bobbing with a tasty riff and an even tastier rhythm. It'll also be fans' first bite of the album.

One track that resonated with Neil instantly was "Abraham Lincoln." He continues, "The lyrics came to me in a flash right after we wrote the music. Writing lyrics can be a whole lot of fun because you're given license to completely lie to everybody. I can imagine myself as someone else and say whatever I want. It's no different than the short story writing process."

In some ways, the album channels the boundless prog spirit of Clutch's earliest offerings such as their much-lauded, massively successful self-titled sophomore record. Strange Cousins is also a natural evolution from the psychedelic blues of 2007's From Beale Street to Oblivion. "There are a couple of grooves and swings in 'The Amazing Kreskin' that are reminiscent of things we did back in the early '90s. Those elements were always a part of our sound, and they've resurfaced here. To strip everything away and bring it down to brass tax was a really good exercise."


Since 1991 these individuals have been challenging rock n' roll's limits, and Clutch show no signs of abandoning the unique experimentation that has defined them. Check out the Spanish cover of Poppo's Blues Band's "Algo Ha Cambiado" for proof. Neil's voice functions as an instrument on its own, and it helps carry Clutch into a new realm.

"If you're not learning then you're retiring," says Neil. "You've got to take risks to learn, and there's always something to learn. When you go to your grave, you're only going to have learned a fraction of what's truly out there. This record isn't so far flung from our other albums and, as far as the spectrum of rock music goes, it's not alien. Nevertheless, if we repeated one formula that would be a slow death."

The only formula that Clutch will ever subscribe to is one of progression—on stage and off. Strange Cousins is particularly special for the band because it's the first full-length of new material to be released via the band's very own indie label, Weathermaker Music. They released a CD/DVD collection of live songs, Full Fathom Five and The Bakerton Group's El Rojo through the label, but this is the first new Clutch to come from Weathermaker."There is a sense of gratification when you can call all the shots and cut out some of the middlemen. There's no artistic difference between what we're doing now and what we've done previously. We always did what we wanted to do even when we were with enormous labels like Atlantic. We've got a really good team put together to do this. We're not going to be the guy on the other side of the desk."

The band recorded the album with J. Robbins (Against Me!) in their hometown, and he once again encouraged them to be themselves. Neil comments, "He's got a really great instinct for capturing the true sound of a band. He's worth his weight and gold with his strong engineering background too."

Live, Clutch still own every stage they stomp onto. They remain a highlight at major festivals and music events worldwide from the UK's Download and Australia's Meredith Music Festival to Bonnaroo in the States. They were also a top act at the renowned Austin City Limits Festival in 2009. No matter what the forum, Clutch have cultivated a live show that can't be stopped. In between all of the festival appearances, Clutch have lined up a slew of headline dates across the U.S. for their faithful.


"The live show has stayed very true to form," explains Neil. "Our overall approach and attitude is no different than it was 15 years ago. We want people feel to like they saw a rock concert. We're not adding a lot of bells and whistles. It's just amps, microphones and the crowd. It's like an event or gathering and it's developed a party atmosphere."

Ultimately, the band's intentions are as pure as they've ever been. "We want fans to listen to the album and escape reality for a little bit and keep coming back to it for that same reason. When I listen to music, it's either in the background or it's to put on headphones and get away. You have your own movie in your head, and everybody's movie is different. If we're providing that soundtrack, that's a very cool thing. There's a sacred, ancient dialog between the musician and the listener. When that happens, it's priceless. That's what I hope people get out of Strange Cousins. It's more of a philosophical reward than anything else."

Isn't that best kind of reward? — Rick Florino
Devin Townsend Project
Devin Townsend Project
"The genesis of it was rooted was in the frustration of it all. Frustrated by the loud…"

For Devin Townsend, ''Casualties of Cool'' is more than just the latest release of a prolific career to-date. You probably know him as the founder of Strapping Young Lad, you might have Steve Vai's Sex & Religion, which features the Canadian metal star on vocals, or the countless other releases he's put his name to. But you can forget all that for now. For Townsend, 'Casualties of Cool' is an escape – from over 20 years of relentless productivity, of the pre-conceptions of him that come with being one of the biggest names in his sphere.

"When you're younger you do these things and of course you become the product of them" he admits. "But as your life changes, your true nature comes through and becomes overlooked in lieu of what people view you as." With metal a genre that's resisted the cultural fragmentation of our age to remain intrinsically tribal, so the family you become part of remain the overbearing baggage you can't throw off – how far do you have to go before you're not, as Devin says, "the guy in the Motley Crue t-shirt?"

It turns out he hasn't had to go far at all.
A project over four years in the making, largely at night when home from turning the dial up for the day job in the studio, 'Casualties of Cool' has seen Townsend look at himself in order to go forward. Digging out a battered old Fender amp and telecaster, he revisited the rootsy country and North American folk music of his youth. It provides the backbone of the album that's eventually come to fruition, opening with 'Daddy's' shuffling percussion and bluesy finger-picked motif, resurfacing during 'The Code's' sultry twilight atmospherics and 'Forgive Me's' hushed ambience. It's a subtly applied but vital part of this record, providing the bones for the flesh to hang from. "My childhood was full of that type of music," says Townsend. "At Christmas my grandfather would insist on the whole family sitting around singing uncomfortably along to Johnny Cash songs and Irish stuff like the Clancy Brothers. It was a big part of my childhood, it's not like I'm putting on a new hat here."
However 'Casualties of Cool' isn't a vehicle for nostalgia either; instead it uses these familiar troupes as leaping off points. Tracks like 'Moon' wind off and away towards astral planes, soft-edged textures coalescing and separating around murmured vocals; 'Bones' relatively straight-up balladry sits side-by-side 'Deathscope's' cavernous production, making for a sweet juxtaposition between that and the intentionally simplistic rockabilly that characterises its structure. Sometimes the quiet is burst open by a bright blast of saxophone or choral chanting, but always, always a sense of night-time and nature pervades.
"There's such a specific environment around my current home in Vancouver," Townsend ponders. "There are coniferous trees, it's really rugged. I find myself more and more just wanting to move north away from people. I like the rain, and the dichotomy of dark and quiet. I like being near the water or the mountains. Spending time in hot, dusty Los Angeles – for instance – in a recording studio isn't stimulating. Making Casualties I found more excuses to get in some kind of environment."

'Casualties of Cool' is a chance to switch off from our hyper-accelerated world, its relentless rush of 24/7 communication, and the competing voices that jostle for attention as they threaten to submerge our own. For Townsend, the themes of the record surround what he believes to be a bridge in his career; an acceptance of the artist he is today and embracing the fear of leaving behind what people know of him.

"The song 'The Bridge' in particular is about transcending this period as opposed to succumbing to the fear and just reverting what I've done before," he explains. "This whole album's about fear; if you're afraid of yourself or success it can be comforting to revel in that and let go - this record is like 'go for it'".

Driven simply by the desire to see how things unfolded, free of the usual recording contract constraints and subsequent limits on time, it's apt that Townsend stumbled on a supporting cast of similarly wandering souls, all revelling in their own sense of outsiderdom. The luxuriant vocals of Che Aimee have draped themselves over a previous Townsend release – 2009's Ki – and so it was perhaps no surprise that the two would find their way back to each other. Keen to keep spontaneity through every process of Casualties… creation, he refused to explain the meanings of the lyrics sent to the singer, while also encouraging her to pen her own for other tracks. "I liked the idea of the concept of the record being rooted in a duality where two people are meeting at a crossroads," he explains. Recorded by Aimee herself on her laptop, her voice is as important as the shuffling folk that permeates the record, in acting as a glue for the whole thing - her wistful tones hold together constructs so freeform at times they might disintegrate.

Like Townsend, drummer Morgan Ågren is a country boy who's found his career pinning him to the city. Having drummed for everyone from Frank Zappa to Meshuggah's Fredrik Thordendal - in a 25 year career beginning in his teenhood - the Swede found himself similarly keen for a respite from the relentless productivity that sessioning and professional collaboration required. In keeping with the spirit of the project, Townsend stumbled upon him thanks to a mutual acquaintance. With a remit to simply drum quietly ("I wanted this record to sound like an AM Radio playing in the background"), Ågren's work over the record anticipates the gradual shifts in mood that shape proceedings, playing with the space of the record and slipping any rhythmical nuances underneath the surface rather than dominating the tone. The pair got together to record the drum parts at his rural home in Sweden – a happy parallel to Townsend's own secluded Oregon surroundings.

Other guests feature too; Townsend cast back into his past in asking flutist Kat Epple to feature on the record – as a child he was blown away by her playing – while 'The Bridge' features a 50-strong Swedish choir, who come together to provide the surging climax of the album. As Townsend would readily admit himself, it's Aimee and Ågren who complete the 'Casualties of Cool', ameliorating the moniker to a positive definition. It's as a group that they renege on the trends of the music industry and the baggage they've amassed within it. This is a project set on a different plain, with space to breathe and explore unhindered, with an artistic freedom they thought they'd long since lost. "That's the whole idea of the 'Casualties of Cool'" comes the simple explanation of a project that – 20 years after his career began – introduces us to the real Devin Townsend.
The Obsessed
The Obsessed
The Obsessed were formed in the late 1970's by teenage friends Scott Weinrich, aka "Wino (2)", (guitar) and Mark Laue (bass) along with drummer Dave Flood (aka "Dave The Slave") and guitarist/vocalist Johnny Reese in Maryland, USA. Over time, the line-up would fluxuate, with Reese leaving, and vocalist Vance Bockis and guitarist Norman Lawson passing through the ranks. Finally, as a trio consisting of Weinrich (now handling vocals and guitar), Laue, and Flood, the band released their debut 7", commonly known as "Sodden Jackyl". The band made a name for themselves in and around Maryland, even gaining a following in Washington DC's famous hardcore punk scene, and made an appearance on a "Metal Massacre" compilation. Flood was eventually replaced by Ed Gulli and this line-up recorded a tape together in 1985 but were unable to find anyone to release it. Faced with a lack of success and label disinterest, the group disbanded shortly afterwards. However, word of the band reached Saint Vitus, whose singer, Scott Reagers, had announced his departure from the band, and they asked Wino to join. The Obsessed tape began making the rounds in tape-trading circles and, soon enough, Hellhound Records, Saint Vitus's German record label, offered to release it. To support its release, Wino put a new version of the band, consisting of drummer Greg Rogers and bassist Scott Reeder (who replaced Danny Hood, who was killed in a motorcycle accident shortly after joining the Obsessed), for a tour. However, after the tour, Wino decided to quit Saint Vitus for reasons that remain a point of contention between Wino and Vitus leader Dave Chandler. Wino maintained that he received Chandler's blessing for the released of the Obsessed album and subsequent tour but upon returning home was unhappy with the new material Chandler was writing and upset that the band chose Don Dokken to produce their next album. Chandler claimed that he was apprehensive about the Obsessed project and that Wino lost interest in Saint Vitus because of it. In any case, the Obsessed was now Wino's full-time band the group recorded "Lunar Womb" for Hellhound in 1991. Dissatisfied with Hellhound, Wino accepted a record deal with Columbia Records for the band's next album "The Church Within", which saw Guy Pinhas replace Scott Reeder. However, life on a major label was not much better. The label pulled promotion for the album just as it was being released and it was a commercial failure. The band soon split and, for a time, Wino sank into substance abuse. However, he eventually managed to clean himself up and, after living for a number of years in Los Angeles, returned to Maryland were he fronted Spirit Caravan and The Hidden Hand before going solo. In 1999, Southern Lord Recordings put together an odds-and-ends collection called "Incarnate".

In February 2016, Wino announced that his band Spirit Caravan would be adopting The Obsessed moniker while continuing to play material from both bands' catalogs.