Marathon Music Works

The Neighbourhood

The Neighbourhood

Travis Scott, White Arrows

Mon, July 14, 2014

Doors: 6:30 pm / Show: 7:30 pm

Marathon Music Works

Nashville, TN

$31

Off Sale

This event is 18 and over

Minors are welcome but must meet these requirements:
1. Minor must present a valid government issued form of identification. Examples include drivers license, passport, military ID, and birth certificate. (non-photo ID is acceptable for minors only). All patron's not accompanied by a parent or legal guardian must present valid government issued photo identification for entry.
2. The minor's legal guardian must attend & accompany the minor at all times.
3. The parent or legal guardian must present valid government issued photo identification for entry.
4. The parent or legal guardian must present proof of guardianship.
Please call 615-891-1781 with any questions
Absolutely no refunds - no exceptions. Lineups and times are subject to change.
Gov't issued ID required. No re-entry.

The Neighbourhood
The Neighbourhood
In early 2012 a mysterious band appeared online. The group, The Neighbourhood, revealed no biographical information, no photos and no backstory, offering only a moody track titled "Female Robbery." Fans and the press were confounded, scouring the Internet for any information that might lead them to the identity of these musicians. Pieces of the puzzle, some reflecting reality and some not so much, began to emerge. The Neighbourhood were a quintet. They were from California despite the British spelling of their name. They had a second track, "Sweater Weather," which had an accompanying -- and equally dark -- video.

Although The Neighbourhood's identity remained hazy, it became clear that the music they were making felt transformative to critics and fans alike. The evocative combination of rock instruments with R&B and hip-hop aesthetics seemed, in many ways, revelatory, a reimagining of sounds that seemed to make people clamor for more information with even greater fervor. In April, BBC Radio One DJ Zane Lowe, an early champion of the group, let it slip that The Neighbourhood was the handiwork of musician Jesse Rutherford, a resident of Newbury Park, CA. By early May, as the band unveiled a free, self-released EP titled "I'm Sorry," it became understood that the identity of this young band was, ultimately, secondary to the music itself.

So who are The Neighbourhood? In essence, the group, which formed in August of 2011, is a collection of five friends who make music together. They're headed by Rutherford, a 21-year-old singer who has dabbled in various genres, including hip-hop, before crafting the merge of sounds that categorizes The Neighbourhood's style. Their debut EP produced by Justyn Pilbrow, who brought Emile Haynie onboard to collaborate on "Female Robbery." The EP, recorded at the end of last year, is composed of shadowy, emotional music with visuals to match. And it's all part of the band's master plan.

"I always have a strong vision before I go into anything," Rutherford says. "I don't know how to make music any other way. It was all in my head, and that vision for the music was to make hip-hop beats with guitars and I was going to sing and rap over them. We wanted to do that hip-hop aesthetic on an indie platform."

"I'm Sorry," a five-song disc, is a precursor to the band's debut album, which is also being produced by Pilbrow and Haynie. The album, expected out March 2013, will expand the group's moody sensibility, which pairs brooding layers of instrumentals with Rutherford's hip-hop-inspired croon. The style, which the band has dubbed "black and white" due to its confident inspirations, is based largely in rhythm, as evidenced by the EP. "When I started in music I started doing drums and then I started doing vocals," Rutherford explains. "And then I combined the two together because to me rapping is just rhythmic vocals. I think the rhythm of hip-hop is really what got me into it. It's not just words being said; it's about how the words are said."

In the end, all you need to know about The Neighbourhood is in that music and in those words. There are more facts, more pieces of the puzzle, more information to unveil. But what's the fun in being given the full picture when you can slowly discover it for yourself? It's better to leave some mystery lingering. Because, after all, it's that unknowing that brought The Neighbourhood to people's attention to begin with.
Travis Scott
Travis Scott
At only 20 years old, Travi$ Scott’s music has already taken him quite a few places, even if he isn’t famous enough to be recognized in any of them yet. He’s lived on the east and west coasts, as well as the “third coast” of his native Houston, Texas, but has seen exotic locales while traveling with the most famous of his early fans, Kanye West. Since meeting early last year, the two have spent countless hours in the studio, the fruits of which can be heard on “Sin City,” Scott’s standout contribution to the G.O.O.D. Music compilation album, Cruel Summer. In his verse, Scott paints a vivid picture of a girl caught up in the allure of the fast life: She stepped into hell, cause when it got cold/Don’t look in her eyes, you might see straight to her soul/Don’t say yes to that good cause you’ll never know/Cause we lost in the city, where sin is no biggie! he raps. The charge is something Scott himself can identify with, his music career having taken flight at an astronomical speed over the course of just a few short years.

Travi$ Scott grew up in Houston the son of a drummer and grandson of a music scholar, bitten himself by the music bug after witnessing the showmanship of late 90’s rap videos from Mase and Diddy and then later on, experiencing the revolutionary production of Kanye West and Pharrell Williams. Scott began making beats when he was just 17 and sought out the tutelage of the local names he had access to, who just so happened to be dirty south hip-hop legends N.O. Joe and Mike Dean. It wasn’t long after that he would venture out to New York to see what he was actually made of. “I’m really into depicting what’s in my life,” Scott says. “Anything I say in these verses, that’s who I am. Those are real stories.” Things didn’t quite take off the way he imagined in New York, Scott having to couch surf when money got low, so he bounced to Los Angeles for another fresh start. The leap of faith paid off with Scott catching the ear of the “King of the South” himself, T.I., who signed him immediately through his GrandHustle/Epic imprint. With Scott working with T.I., it wasn’t long before Kanye West got wind of him, both superstars still utilizing the young prodigy whenever possible.

And though he continues to work on music with his mentors, Travi$ Scott’s own Owl Pharaoh EP is soon to set the world ablaze, Scott using everything he’s learned from his forefathers to make the project he’s sure will satisfy a rapidly growing fanbase. “People are gonna feel the imagery, what my life consists of, what the world of Travi$ Scott is,” he says. “What is this kid thinking? Who is this kid? What is he trying to tell us? That’s what they gone feel through these songs.” So far they’ve had only morsels to chew on, but the demand grows with each leak like “Blocka,” the song he co-produced with Young Chop and raps on with Pusha T, or the super-stylized “Quintana” video or the riot-inducing, Mike Will-produced, “Pus$$y,” which features Chuck Inglish, Fredo Santana and Gunplay. Travi$ Scott has collaborated with some of the biggest names in rap and he hasn’t even released his EP yet. “It’s like becoming friends,” Scott says of his music. “Once people get to hang around you more and more, they’ll start to understand you. They’ll either catch on or they’ll get left behind.” And soon enough, the world will know what so many of our favorite rappers already do: That Travi$ Scott is the future.
White Arrows
White Arrows
White Arrows stands at these balmy crossroads like a vision from an alternate reality: classic without leaning on nostalgia, visionary but not unfamiliar. What should be a collision of sounds and styles—ritualistic rhythm and four-four thump, synth sequences and strummed guitars, garage-y grind and airy atmosphere—is, in this quintet's capable hands, a fluidly seething whole. Call it Psychotropical pop, something both busy and breezy. Call it Paul Simon in space (others have). Call it what you will. This is White Arrows.

The White Arrows story begins with a blind boy. Singer Mickey Church was born seeing the world as an impressionistic smear. His vision was righted at age 11, but his imagination ran wild for the intervening years. His memory of growing up in L.A. is confined to smells, sounds and swaths of fuzzy color. With family back east, Mickey eventually left for NYU, and unexpectedly wound up creating his own major with a degree in shamanistic ritual.

The band consists of his younger brother Henry, who started playing drums for the band while still in high school, their old friend J.P. Caballero, previously of Dios Malos, on guitar, Andrew Naeve on keys and electronics, and Steven Vernet on bass. The five bonded over a shared love for sensory overload both aural and visual—essential to the White Arrows live show which currently employs plenty of fog, lights and visuals with hopes of making it bigger and better each tour. With only a 7-inch to sell, they toured with Cults, Those Darlins, The Naked and Famous, played Sasquatch, opened for Weezer, and held residencies at home and in London in 2011.

With the release of the album, "Dry Land Is Not A Myth" in June, the band has been on the road almost continuously this year with Beat Connection, White Denim, Givers, and Unknown Mortal Orchestra with no plans to slow down and trips to Australia, the United States, and both the UK and Europe to close out the year.