Chromeo

Chromeo

Steven A. Clark

Saturday, September 22

Doors: 6:30 pm / Show: 8:00 pm

$30 - $119

This event is all ages

Chromeo
Chromeo
With a love of talkboxes, vintage drum machines, and gleamingly plastic synth tones, Montreal electro-funk duo Chromeo developed a sound that looked to the deepest echelon of '80s funk and radio R&B to develop their sound. While wearing the influence of Zapp, Prince, and even Hall & Oates on their sleeve, their style would grow more refined as the years went on, with production getting more detailed as their songwriting became more nuanced. The band's homage to the greats of the dancefloor and its unbridled worship of pop found its summit on their fourth album, 2014’s White Women. By then the group had fine-tuned their formula and also opened up their creative world to guest vocalists and producers, maximizing their mainstream accessibility and resulting in their highest-charting release.

Chromeo were formed in 2002 by Montreal producers David "Dave One" Macklovitch and Patrick "Pee Thug" Gemayel. Dave One took on vocal duties, though both former hip-hop producers were multi-instrumentalists and brought their love of classic funk and soul to their nascent creations. The "Destination Overdrive" single appeared in late 2003, complete with the tingling B-side "Needy Girl" (a ringer for Yaz's "Situation") and a DFA remix. The single was followed by a proper full-length debut, She's in Control, released on Vice in early February 2004. To satiate their fans between records, Chromeo issued two mixes, 2005's Un Joli Mix Pour Toi and 2006's Ce Soir on Danse!, while gigging and working on their second album. Fancy Footwork arrived in the summer of 2007, boasting a slicker sound and poppier songwriting (courtesy of Cassius' Philippe Zdar on mixing duties), plus an avalanche of remixes. In the summer of 2008, they would collaborate with Hall & Oates' own Daryl Hall for part of his online series Live from Daryl's House. As fans awaited another album, Chromeo released DJ-Kicks in 2009. They finally returned in August 2010 with Business Casual, released by Atlantic Records in the U.S. The singles "Over Your Shoulder" and "Sexy Socialite" were released in 2013, and both landed on the following year's White Women, an album that featured Solange, Vampire Weekend's Ezra Koenig, and, in affirmation of their indebtedness to early-'80s R&B, vocalist Tawatha Agee (of Mtume). The duo's highest Billboard debut, it narrowly missed the Top Ten. Four years later, the band returned with fifth album Head Over Heels, another album heavy on guest contributions from the likes of DRAM, French Montana, Amber Mark, and others.

- from AllMusic.com
Steven A. Clark
Steven A. Clark
Outlaws and outsiders, road-trippers and lonely rollers; whether it’s someone searching or someone who doesn’t want to be found, we can’t help but be drawn to the drifters. Singer Steven A. Clark is that next stranger to roll in from out of town, a restless artist recasting R&B. He’s a straight-talker in a genre filled with wish-fulfillment, whimsy and cliched beats; think the Outlaw Josey Wales raised on N.E.R.D. and 808 & Heartbreak.

On his cinematic new album Lonely Roller, Clark’s descriptions of emotions and bad breaks aren’t just a set-up. It’s personal identification set to song, new additions to a canon looking for fresh blood. At a time when artists such as Frank Ocean and Abel Tasfaye are pushing back boundaries and making clean-cut definitions of R&B obsolete, Clark continues charting his own creative and confessional path.

“Rhythm and blues ain’t all candy and hearts,” he says. “There is real emotion, and lots of times, artists don’t always go there. Tapping into the darker side helps make a song more real, and keeps things fresh.”

Miami-by-way of Fayetteville and Little Rock, Clark’s raw, confessional singing and personal stories pair with pulsing synthesizers and rhythms that hang in the air like a glowing grid of roadside neon. It’s a means for the soft-spoken artist to process all the drama in his head. On songs such as “Not You,” he flips a brutally honest breakup tale and draws emotions and empathy from being on the “right” side of the conversation. The title track uses a slinky, sensual beat to create a perfect backdrop to tell the story of a weekend-long tryst in Vegas. For a man of few words, his unadorned and uncomplicated lyrics hit home.

“I don’t want to just be some guy trying to bring something back, but I always think there is room for a flawed character,” he says. “The characters in the songs and me, they’re often the same guy.”