Boy Named Banjo

Lightning 100 Presents

Boy Named Banjo

The War and Treaty, Guthrie Brown

Friday, November 23

Doors: 6:30 pm / Show: 8:00 pm

$15.00 - $50.00

This event is all ages

Join Lightning 100 and Marathon Music Works as we salute our veterans with a live concert which will highlight & support Middle Tennessee Veterans & charities. Three Middle Tennessee Veteran Charities have been selected to receive proceeds from this event and we are excited to embrace ReBoot Combat Recovery, Operation Song & CreatiVets.


Sponsored by: Tito's Handmade Vodka, Metro PCS

No refunds - No exceptions. Lineups and times are subject to change. Valid government-issued photo ID required. Tickets available at the door (if not sold out). No re-entry.

Boy Named Banjo
Boy Named Banjo
Long before Boy Named Banjo, two of the founding members of the genre-breaking band grew up a mile down the road from each other in Nashville. William Reames and Willard Logan both picked up the guitar at an early age, took lessons from the same teacher in town, went to the same school, and even played in the same middle school band together.

A shared love for bluegrass, folk, and singer/songwriter music sparked a different musical friendship for Reames between him and banjo player, Barton Davies. Before long, the two youngsters enthusiastically bounced songs off each other and discovered some of their favorite bands like The Steel Drivers, John Hartford, and The Infamous Stringdusters together. In no time at all, they were writing and performing songs of their own, an at the age of 16, they formed their own band. Only, they needed a mandolin player. That's when they called Logan - and the two longtime friends, and now, Davies, were bandmates once again.

"We were still too young to step foot inside a bar when we first started to play," Davies recalls, "so we'd set up shop on the sidewalk outside of Robert's Western World in downtown Nashville and play our own songs for whomever would listen." According to Davies - about halfway through one of their sets, a man came stumbling out of Robert's, got in Barton's face and yelled "play that thing, Banjo Boy! Faster now, ya hear? C'mon, Banjo!"

Reames texted Davies later that night - "Boy Named Banjo."

With a brand new band name and a bunch of original songs, the trio recorded The Tanglewood Sessions, an honest, emotional, roots-driven look into the lives of the young outfit. Unexpectedly, the debut album was received quite well and now has over 3 million streams on Spotify.

In 2014, BNB added drummer Sam McCullough and released its sophomore album, Long Story Short. The band got its first breakthrough by earning a spot on the 2015 Bonnaroo lineup, which led to some hometown love for the native Nashvillians, including a nomination for Best Local Band by The Tennesseean. Shortly after releasing Lost on Main EP in 2015, Boy Named Banjo found its missing piece - Ford Garrard (bass), hit the road, and hasn't stopped touring since.

Boy Named Banjo's sound has grown up alongside them into an energetic blend of rock, folk-pop, and alt-country that will keep listeners smiling, clapping, and dancing along for many years to come. You won't want to miss what they have have been cooking up for 2018. Catch a live show and find out why.
The War and Treaty
The War and Treaty
As The War and Treaty, Michael and Tanya Trotter serve up healing and pain robbing with freewheeling joy on their new full-length album, Healing Tide. Funky bass lines, keys, lap steel, acoustic strings, and stripped-down percussion create a swampy Southern soul bed for the couple’s transcendent vocals. A tour-de-force produced by Buddy Miller, the collection swaggers with confidence only gained by artists who are wholly, proudly, themselves.
Michael is a wounded warrior who found his voice while serving in Iraq, when he was pulled from the frontlines to write songs for the fallen. Tanya is a lifelong artist, drawn to singing’s power to take another’s pain away. “You have to have a deep place of love within yourself to be vulnerable,” Tanya says. “With The War and Treaty, we allow people to see two people that are not perfect. We get on stage. We sweat. We’re overweight. We yell. We get ugly, we scream! My hair comes loose. We’re vulnerable––naked––in front of people, and it’s a chain reaction. It allows them to be vulnerable, too.”
The War and Treaty’s music and stories bring tears and goosebumps, but ultimately, more is at work. “I want people to feel like we care,” Michael says. “When you think about artists, you don’t think about that.” He pauses and grins broadly. “But that’s the way I want the world to feel about The War and Treaty.”
Guthrie Brown
Guthrie Brown
Guthrie Brown a Nashville transplant by way of "old Montana" began playing the guitar at age six. By the age of seventeen, he journeyed to Nashville to pursue the dream of being a professional songwriter, recording & performing artist. After settling in Music City, he recorded and produced his first self-titled EP, which got the attention of Nashville's premiere independent radio station, WRLT Lightning 100. Capitalizing on the initial success of his debut EP, Guthrie recorded and released his second EP "Spirit of the Elk" with producer Stuart Mathis (The Wallflowers, Lucinda Williams). Following his second release, he recruited his longtime friends and musicians John Ogelby (drums), Will Honaker (bass, keys) and John McNally (guitar) to join the band. Their musical pairing has since been compared to something as strong and pure as Tom Petty and the Heartbreakers.

Since the release of "Spirit of the Elk", Guthrie and his band of brothers, have continued their regiment of non-stop touring including coveted spots opening for Jonny Lang, Willie Nelson, Robert Randolf, and Bears Den and festivals such as Gasparilla, and CMJ Fest, just to name a few. In the summer of 2016, Guthrie signed his first publishing deal with BMG. He will spend the second half of the year touring and recording with multi Grammy Award winning producer, Jacquire King (Kings of Leon, Norah Jones, Tom waits, Moon Taxi, Of Monsters and Men, James Bay).